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Int J Mol Sci. 2011 Jan 17;12(1):506-69. doi: 10.3390/ijms12010506.

The biochemical and cellular basis for nutraceutical strategies to attenuate neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Florida A&M University, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA; E-Mails: elizabethmazzio@yahoo.com (E.A.M.); fran.close@famu.edu (F.C.).

Abstract

Future therapeutic intervention that could effectively decelerate the rate of degeneration within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) could add years of mobility and reduce morbidity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Neurodegenerative decline associated with PD is distinguished by extensive damage to SNc dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and decay of the striatal tract. While genetic mutations or environmental toxins can precipitate pathology, progressive degenerative succession involves a gradual decline in DA neurotransmission/synaptic uptake, impaired oxidative glucose consumption, a rise in striatal lactate and chronic inflammation. Nutraceuticals play a fundamental role in energy metabolism and signaling transduction pathways that control neurotransmission and inflammation. However, the use of nutritional supplements to slow the progression of PD has met with considerable challenge and has thus far proven unsuccessful. This review re-examines precipitating factors and insults involved in PD and how nutraceuticals can affect each of these biological targets. Discussed are disease dynamics (Sections 1 and 2) and natural substances, vitamins and minerals that could impact disease processes (Section 3). Topics include nutritional influences on α-synuclein aggregation, ubiquitin proteasome function, mTOR signaling/lysosomal-autophagy, energy failure, faulty catecholamine trafficking, DA oxidation, synthesis of toxic DA-quinones, o-semiquinones, benzothiazolines, hyperhomocyseinemia, methylation, inflammation and irreversible oxidation of neuromelanin. In summary, it is clear that future research will be required to consider the multi-faceted nature of this disease and re-examine how and why the use of nutritional multi-vitamin-mineral and plant-based combinations could be used to slow the progression of PD, if possible.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson’s disease; neuromelanin; neuroprotective; nutrition; vitamins

PMID:
21340000
PMCID:
PMC3039966
DOI:
10.3390/ijms12010506
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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