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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Jun;35(6):1034-40. doi: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01435.x. Epub 2011 Feb 17.

Alcohol effects on cerebral blood flow in subjects with low and high responses to alcohol.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although there are multiple indications that alcohol can alter many physiological brain functions, including cerebral blood flow (CBF), studies of the latter have generally used small- or modest-sized samples. Few investigations have yet evaluated how CBF changes after alcohol relate to subsets of subjects with elevated alcoholism risks, such as those with lower levels of response (LR) to alcohol. This study used arterial spin labeling (ASL) after alcohol administration to evaluate a large sample of healthy young men and women with low and high alcohol responses, and, thus, varying risks for alcohol use disorders (AUD).

METHODS:

Healthy young adult social drinkers with low and high LR (N=88, 50% women) matched on demography and drinking histories were imaged with whole-brain resting ASL ~1 hour after ingesting ~3 drinks of ethanol and after a placebo beverage (i.e., 178 ASL sessions). The relationships of CBF changes from placebo to alcohol for subjects with low and high LR were evaluated.

RESULTS:

CBF increased after alcohol when compared to placebo in 5 frontal brain regions. Despite identical blood alcohol concentrations, these increases with alcohol were less prominent in individuals who required more drinks to experience alcohol-related effects (i.e., had a lower LR to alcohol). The LR group differences remained significant after covarying for recent drinking quantities.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results confirm that alcohol intake is associated with acute increases in CBF, particularly in frontal regions. Less intense CBF changes were seen in subjects with a genetically influenced characteristic, a low LR to alcohol, that relates to the future risk of heavy drinking and alcohol problems.

PMID:
21332525
PMCID:
PMC3097275
DOI:
10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01435.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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