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J Periodontal Res. 2011 Aug;46(4):407-16. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0765.2011.01353.x. Epub 2011 Feb 17.

Periodontal ligament and gingival fibroblasts from periodontitis patients are more active in interaction with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Microbiology, Research Institute MOVE, University of Amsterdam, TheNetherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Inflammatory responses of host cells to oral pathogenic bacteria, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, are crucial in the development of periodontitis. Host cells, such as periodontal ligament and gingival fibroblasts, from periodontitis patients may respond to P. gingivalis in a different manner compared with cells from healthy persons. The aim of this study was to investigate inflammatory responses to viable P. gingivalis by periodontal ligament and gingival fibroblasts from periodontitis patients and healthy control subjects.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Primary periodontal ligament and gingival fibroblasts from periodontitis patients (n=14) and healthy control subjects (n=8) were challenged in vitro with viable P. gingivalis. Gene expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 9, CD14, nuclear factor-κB1 and its putative inhibitor NF-κB inhibitor-like protein1, and of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, tumour necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and regulated upon activation, normal T-cel expressed, and secreted, were assessed by real-time PCR.

RESULTS:

  Periodontal ligament fibroblasts from periodontitis patients had a higher mRNA expression of TLR1, TLR4, TLR7 and CD14, and a lower expression of NFKBIL1, both before and after P. gingivalis challenge. In contrast, gingival fibroblasts from periodontitis patients had stronger induction of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR7 by P. gingivalis. Cytokine responses were not different between patients and control subjects. Interestingly, periodontal ligament, but not gingival, fibroblasts from P. gingivalis culture-positive persons responded more strongly to P. gingivalis than periodontal ligament fibroblasts from P. gingivalis-negative persons.

CONCLUSION:

Periodontal ligament and gingival fibroblasts respond to P. gingivalis in a different manner and may play different roles in periodontitis. Both subsets of fibroblasts from patients appear more active in interaction with P. gingivalis. Moreover, periodontal ligament fibroblasts from P. gingivalis-positive donors are more responsive to an in vitro P. gingivalis challenge.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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