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Ghana Med J. 2010 Sep;44(3):98-102.

A two-year review of uterine rupture in a regional hospital.

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1
Ghana Health Service, Regional Hospital, Wa, Upper West Region, Ghana.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Uterine rupture causes high maternal and neonatal mortality in many rural setting in the world. Further studies might provide specific interventions to reduce the high prevalence.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the frequency, causes, clinical presentation, management and outcome of uterine rupture

SETTING:

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Upper West Regional Hospital, Wa, Ghana.

DESIGN:

Retrospective descriptive study.

METHOD:

A descriptive study of cases of ruptured uterus in the Regional Hospital from 1st January, 2007 to 31st December 2008 was done. A structured questionnaire was developed to collate data from various registers for analysis.

RESULTS:

Total deliveries were 5085 with 4172(82%) spontaneous vaginal delivery and 911(17.9%) caesarean sections. Uterine rupture occurred in 41 cases for a ratio of 1:124 Grand multipara with five or more deliveries represented 41.5% while those with two prior successful deliveries represented 31.7%. The mean parity was 3.8 (SD 2.3) under antenatal care, 85.4% had at least four visits. Severe anaemia 28(68.3%) and abdominal tenderness 27(65.8%) were the most frequent clinical presentation while the use of local herbal concoction with suspected uterotonic activity 24(58.5%), fetopelvic disproportion 4 (9.8%) and malpresentation 5(12.1%) were the most significant causes. Major complications were: neonatal deaths 34(82.9%), maternal mortality 4(9.8%) and wound infections 15 (36.6%). Subtotal hysterectomy 10(24.4%) and total hysterectomy 18(43.8%) were preferred to uterine repair 12(23.3%) and 87.8% required at least two units of blood transfusion.

CONCLUSION:

skilled attendance with accessible emergency obstetric care and focused antenatal care are key elements for the prevention and management of uterine rupture.

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