Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2011 Jul;30(7):566-9. doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e31820e8638.

Effectiveness of serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine: a 7-year follow-up in Quebec, Canada.

Author information

1
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada. philippe.dewals@msp.ulaval.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A mass immunization campaign was implemented in 2001 to control a serogroup C meningococcal disease outbreak, and a newly licensed serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (C-MCV) was used. In 2002, 1 C-MCV dose was routinely offered to children 12 months of age.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the epidemiologic effect of the campaign and C-MCV effectiveness during a 7-year period according to age at vaccination and delay since vaccine administration.

METHODS:

Cases of invasive meningococcal infection reported to public health authorities and the reference laboratory during the period 1990 to 2008 were obtained to calculate year- and age-specific incidence rates. Multiple sources were used to ascertain the immunization status of cases. Immunization registry data were used to estimate age-specific C-MCV uptake rates in different birth cohorts. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated by Mantel-Haenszel method and logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

After mass immunization campaign, meningococcal C disease incidence decreased markedly not only in highly vaccinated but also in poorly vaccinated and nonvaccinated birth cohorts. Overall vaccine effectiveness was 87.4% (95% CI: 75.4%-94.2%) with lower protection in children vaccinated <2 years of age and waning of protection of higher magnitude in this age group.

CONCLUSION:

Results support the current Canadian recommendation to provide booster vaccination for adolescents.

PMID:
21326136
DOI:
10.1097/INF.0b013e31820e8638
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center