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Gut. 2011 Aug;60(8):1103-8. doi: 10.1136/gut.2010.230011. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

Pancreas divisum as a predisposing factor for chronic and recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis: initial in vivo survey.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. watapi-tky@umin.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It is a controversial issue whether pancreas divisum (PD) induces pancreatitis. All previous studies have investigated this issue based on endoscopic procedures, which inevitably involve a selection bias.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the unbiased prevalence rate of PD in a community population and to investigate the effect of PD on idiopathic pancreatitis using a non-invasive magnetic resonance (MR) technique.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

PATIENTS:

The study enrolled 504 subjects from the community who participated in the medical check-up programme and 46 patients with idiopathic pancreatitis (8 acute, 23 chronic, 15 recurrent) extracted from 70,122 consecutive MR studies performed at an academic tertiary care hospital.

INTERVENTIONS:

All subjects underwent magnetic resonance (MR) scanning and medical examination.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Statistical comparison between subjects from the community and patients with idiopathic pancreatitis was made for the rate of PD (and its subtypes: classical PD, PD with absent ventral duct, and incomplete PD), MR findings, and clinical features.

RESULTS:

Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed PD as a significant factor that induces pancreatitis (OR 23.4; p<0.0001). The PD rate was significantly higher for all/chronic/recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis patients (35%/43%/33%; p<0.001 for all) than for subjects in the community group (2.6%), but was not higher for acute pancreatitis (13%; p=0.357). All PD subtypes were indicated to induce idiopathic pancreatitis but showed different associations with each onset type of pancreatitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study to describe the prevalence of PD and PD subtypes in a community population and their association with idiopathic pancreatitis in vivo based on the findings of non-invasive MR and with minimal selection bias. It is concluded that PD should be considered a predisposing factor for chronic and recurrent pancreatitis.

PMID:
21325173
DOI:
10.1136/gut.2010.230011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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