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Ann Hum Biol. 2011 May;38(3):354-9. doi: 10.3109/03014460.2011.553203. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

Cross-sectional study of risk factors for atherosclerosis in the Azorean population.

Author information

1
Center of Research in Natural Resources (CIRN), University of the Azores, Ponta Delgada, Portugal. tcymbron@uac.pt

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Atherosclerosis-a major cause of vascular disease, including ischemic heart disease (IHD), is a pathology that has a two-fold higher mortality rate in the Azorean Islands compared to mainland Portugal.

AIM:

This cross-sectional study investigated the role of genetic variation in the prevalence of atherosclerosis in this population.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A total of 305 individuals were characterized for polymorphisms in eight susceptibility genes for atherosclerosis: ACE, PAI1, NOS3, LTA, FGB, ITGB3, PON1 and APOE. Data were analysed with respect to phenotypic characteristics such as blood pressure, lipid profile, life-style risk factors and familial history of myocardial infarction.

RESULTS:

In the total sample, frequencies for hypercholestrolemic, hypertensive and obese individuals were 63.6%, 39.3% and 23.3%, respectively. The genetic profile was similar to that observed in other European populations, namely in mainland Portugal. No over-representation of risk alleles was evidenced in this sample.

CONCLUSIONS:

One has to consider the possibility of an important non-genetic influence on the high cholesterolemia present in the Azorean population. Since diet is the most important life-style risk factor for dyslipidemia, studies aiming to evaluate the dietary characteristics of this population and its impact on serum lipid levels will be of major importance.

PMID:
21322770
DOI:
10.3109/03014460.2011.553203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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