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J Clin Nurs. 2011 Nov;20(21-22):3048-56. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03693.x. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

Predictors of health-related quality of life in a sample of children and adolescents: a school survey.

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1
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. kristin.haraldstad@su.hio.no

Abstract

AIM:

The aim is to study the health-related quality of life in a school sample of children and adolescents aged 8-18 years and to examine the relationship between health-related quality of life and the following variables; age, gender, perceived pain, body image, body mass index and bullying.

BACKGROUND:

The study of health-related quality of life in children and adolescents have received little attention compared with adults in health care research and still little is known about the associations between health-related quality of life and other variables.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional design was chosen.

METHOD:

We measured the health-related quality of life using the generic questionnaire KIDSCREEN-10. We administered the KIDSCREEN 52-item, and the 10 items were selected from this according to the KIDSCREEN manual. Multilevel regression models were used to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life and the independent variables.

RESULTS:

The sample included 1066 children and adolescents, 576 girls and 490 boys, with a response rate of 74%. The results show that body mass index was not significant associated with health-related quality of life in full model. However, in addition to age, being bullied, pain and body image were significant associated with health-related quality of life. Of these predictors, body image has the strongest impact in terms of explained variance in health-related quality of life.

CONCLUSION:

The subjective sense of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with one's body, perceived body image, is a powerful predictor of health-related quality of life.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

Knowledge about predictors of health-related quality of life is especially important for public health nurses. Health promotion and intervention programmes that aim to strengthen psychosocial well-being, especially those that strengthen body image, should be developed for both genders.

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