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Am J Ther. 2012 Nov;19(6):e157-66. doi: 10.1097/MJT.0b013e31820543c5.

Comorbidity burden, healthcare resource utilization, and costs in chronic gout patients refractory to conventional urate-lowering therapy.

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1
Analysis Group, Inc., Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Patients with chronic gout refractory to conventional urate-lowering therapy have high rates of flares and incidence of tophi, which impose a significant disease and potentially economic burden. This study examined healthcare resource use and costs stratified by disease burden. Adult patients diagnosed with gout (ICD-9-CM:274.xx) and having had ≥3 flares defined by clinical surrogates within a 12-month period were selected for the case cohort from the Thomson MarketScan databases (2003/Q3-2008/Q3). Only patients who had received allopurinol treatment and a diagnosis of tophi (ICD-9-CM:274.8x) at any time before the first flare (index date) or within 12 months postindex were included and were matched in a 1:1 ratio with control gout-free subjects. The comorbidity burden, healthcare resource use, and annual healthcare costs (2008 US$) in the 12-month postindex period were compared between both cohorts using regression models adjusted for demographic characteristic and stratified for patients with ≥6 flares. A total of 679 gout patients met the inclusion criteria for the study and had a higher prevalence of comorbidities than their matched controls. Gout cohort had a significantly higher incidence of emergency room, hospitalizations, outpatient visits, and other medical services than did their matched controls (all comparisons, uncorrected P < 0.01). After adjusting for baseline characteristics, the refractory gout cohort incurred an incremental total annual healthcare cost of $10,222 where 40% of the annual medical cost was for gout-related care compared with control cohort (P < 0.01). Patients with refractory gout have a significant economic burden compared with a gout-free population.

PMID:
21317625
DOI:
10.1097/MJT.0b013e31820543c5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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