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BMJ Qual Saf. 2011 Apr;20(4):372-80. doi: 10.1136/bmjqs.2010.047845. Epub 2011 Feb 11.

Utilising improvement science methods to optimise medication reconciliation.

Author information

1
Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, OH 45229-3039, USA. christine.white@cchmc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2005, The Joint Commission included medication reconciliation as a National Patient Safety Goal to reduce medication errors related to omissions, duplications and interactions. Hospitals continue to struggle to implement successful programmes that meet these objectives.

METHODS:

The authors used improvement methods and reliability principles to develop and implement a process for medication reconciliation completion at admission at a large, paediatric medical centre. Medication reconciliation was defined as recording a complete and accurate list of each patient's medications within 20 min of admission by the nurse and reconciliation of those medications within 24 h of admission by the physician. Interventions focused on five main areas: leadership and support from senior physicians and nurses to sustain a culture of safety; simplification and standardisation of the electronic medication reconciliation application; clarifying roles and responsibilities; creating a highly reliable and visible system; and sustainability.

RESULTS:

At baseline, only 62% of patients had their medications reconciled within 24 h of admission. Over a 9-month period, ≥90% medication reconciliation was achieved within 24 h of admission. These results have been sustained for 27 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Through the use of improvement methods and reliability science, a sustainable process for medical reconciliation completion at admission was successfully achieved at a large, busy academic children's hospital.

PMID:
21317180
DOI:
10.1136/bmjqs.2010.047845
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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