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Knee. 2012 Mar;19(2):87-93. doi: 10.1016/j.knee.2011.01.003. Epub 2011 Feb 12.

Evaluation of tibial rotational stability of single-bundle vs. anatomical double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction during a high-demand activity - a quasi-randomized trial.

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1
University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Ibaraki, Japan. misson@pc5.so-net.ne.jp

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the tibial rotational stability of anatomical double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees with single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knees during a high-demand activity. Total of 66 subjects, (22 with double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 22 with single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and 22 healthy control individuals) were examined in this study. Using a 9-camera motion analysis system, motion subjects were recorded performing during a drop landing and cutting. Using the point cluster technique, the internal-external tibial rotation of both knees was calculated. The mean maximum range of motion for each knee was evaluated for 3 groups (double-bundle group, single-bundle group, and control group). Clinical assessment, including Tegner score, Lysholm score, and knee arthrometric measurement, revealed restoration of the reconstructed knee stability with no differences between the two anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction groups. The results showed that both groups resulted in tibial rotation values that were significantly smaller than those in the intact legs and those in the healthy controls. There were no significant differences in tibial rotation between the DB group and the SB group. Therefore anatomical double-bundle reconstruction restores normal tibial rotation no more than single-bundle reconstruction during this high-demand dynamic activity. These results suggest a trend towards dynamic overcorrection after the ACL reconstruction.

PMID:
21316972
DOI:
10.1016/j.knee.2011.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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