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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 Mar;64(3):524-35. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2010.06.045.

Radiofrequency facial rejuvenation: evidence-based effect.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Al-Minya University, Al-Minya, Egypt.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multiple therapies involving ablative and nonablative techniques have been developed for rejuvenation of photodamaged skin. Monopolar radiofrequency (RF) is emerging as a gentler, nonablative skin-tightening device that delivers uniform heat to the dermis at a controlled depth.

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated the clinical effects and objectively quantified the histologic changes of the nonablative RF device in the treatment of photoaging.

METHODS:

Six individuals of Fitzpatrick skin type III to IV and Glogau class I to II wrinkles were subjected to 3 months of treatment (6 sessions at 2-week intervals). Standard photographs and skin biopsy specimens were obtained at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months after the start of treatment. We performed quantitative evaluation of total elastin, collagen types I and III, and newly synthesized collagen using computerized histometric and immunohistochemical techniques. Blinded photographs were independently scored for wrinkle improvement.

RESULTS:

RF produced noticeable clinical results, with high satisfaction and corresponding facial skin improvement. Compared with the baseline, there was a statistically significant increase in the mean of collagen types I and III, and newly synthesized collagen, while the mean of total elastin was significantly decreased, at the end of treatment and 3 months posttreatment.

LIMITATIONS:

A limitation of this study is the small number of patients, yet the results show a significant improvement.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the results may not be as impressive as those obtained by ablative treatments, RF is a promising treatment option for photoaging with fewer side effects and downtime.

PMID:
21315951
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2010.06.045
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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