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Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2011 Apr;113(1):32-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ijgo.2010.10.025.

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection during pregnancy in South India.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit III, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, India. angsumita@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the clinical profile of pregnant/puerperal women from a semi-urban Indian population who were infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus (P[H1N1]2009v) and to evaluate their outcome.

METHODS:

In a cross-sectional study, 566 women (79 pregnant/puerperal, 487 nonpregnant) who presented to a tertiary care hospital with influenza-like illness were tested for P(H1N1)2009v by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Outcomes measures were the maternal mortality and the perinatal mortality rate (PMR).

RESULTS:

Twenty (25%) pregnant/puerperal and 144 (30%) nonpregnant women tested positive for P(H1N1)2009v, with 5 pregnant and 3 postpartum women requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). P(H1N1)2009v-related mortality was higher in pregnant than nonpregnant women (25% versus 8%; P=0.04). In the pregnant/puerperal cohort, factors associated with death included delayed presentation (median 6days versus 1.5days in survivors; P=0.007), need for ICU admission (P=0.004), need for ventilation (P=0.001), and renal failure (P=0.001). The PMR was 55.5/1000 births compared with 33.5/1000 births in the hospital overall during the study period.

CONCLUSION:

In a low-income country, P(H1N1)2009v infection in pregnancy is associated with considerable mortality. Delayed presentation to a tertiary care center, lack of awareness, and restricted access to treatment might have contributed to the high mortality.

PMID:
21315351
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijgo.2010.10.025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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