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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Sep;43(9):1649-56. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318211bf45.

Impairment of 3000-m run time at altitude is influenced by arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation.

Author information

1
Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA. rfchapma@indiana.edu

Abstract

The decline in maximal oxygen uptake (ΔVO(2)max) with acute exposure to moderate altitude is dependent on the ability to maintain arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2).

PURPOSE:

This study examined if factors related to ΔVO(2)max at altitude are also related to the decline in race performance of elite athletes at altitude.

METHODS:

Twenty-seven elite distance runners (18 men and 9 women, VO(2)max = 71.8 ± 7.2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) performed a treadmill exercise at a constant speed that simulated their 3000-m race pace, both in normoxia and in 16.3% O2 (∼2100 m). Separate 3000-m time trials were completed at sea level (18 h before altitude exposure) and at 2100 m (48 h after arrival at altitude). Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05.

RESULTS:

Group 3000-m performance was significantly slower at altitude versus sea level (48.5 ± 12.7 s), and the declines were significant in men (48.4 ± 14.6 s) and women (48.6 ± 8.9 s). Athletes grouped by low SaO2 during race pace in normoxia (SaO2 < 91%, n = 7) had a significantly larger ΔVO(2) in hypoxia (-9.2 ± 2.1 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and Δ3000-m time at altitude (54.0 ± 13.7 s) compared with athletes with high SaO2 in normoxia (SaO2 > 93%, n = 7, ΔVO(2) = -3.5 ± 2.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), Δ3000-m time = 38.9 ± 9.7 s). For all athletes, SaO2 during normoxic race pace running was significantly correlated with both ΔVO(2) (r = -0.68) and Δ3000-m time (r = -0.38).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results indicate that the degree of arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation, already known to influence ΔVO(2)max at altitude, also contributes to the magnitude of decline in race performance at altitude.

PMID:
21311361
DOI:
10.1249/MSS.0b013e318211bf45
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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