Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Addiction. 2011 May;106(5):1003-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03391.x.

Influence of traditional tobacco use on smoking cessation among American Indians.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

To examine the influence of traditional tobacco use on smoking cessation among American Indian adult smokers.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

A cross-sectional survey of self-identified American Indians was conducted from 2008 to 2009. A total of 998 American Indian adults (18 years and older) from the Midwest participated in the study.

MEASUREMENTS:

Traditional tobacco use and method of traditional use were both assessed. Commercial tobacco use (current smoking) was obtained through self-reported information as well as the length of their most recent quit attempt. We also assessed knowledge and awareness of pharmacotherapy for current smokers.

FINDINGS:

Among participants in our study, 33.3% were current smokers and they reported smoking an average of 10 cigarettes per day. American Indian current smokers who used traditional tobacco reported a greater number of days abstinent during their last quit attempt compared to those who do not use traditional tobacco (P = 0.01). However, it appears that this protective effect of traditional tobacco use is diminished if the person smokes traditional tobacco. Finally, very few (fewer than 20% of current smokers) were aware of more recent forms of pharmacotherapy such as Chantix or bupropion.

CONCLUSIONS:

American Indians appear to show low levels of awareness of effective pharmacotherapies to aid smoking cessation, but those who use 'traditional tobacco' report somewhat longer periods of abstinence from past quit attempts.

PMID:
21306597
PMCID:
PMC3074043
DOI:
10.1111/j.1360-0443.2011.03391.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center