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Lupus. 2011 Feb;20(2):158-64. doi: 10.1177/0961203310395054.

Report of the Obstetric APS Task Force: 13th International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies, 13th April 2010.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA. Wareb@aol.com

Abstract

The Obstetric APS Task Force of the 13th International Congress identified and discussed five general topics within 'Obstetric' Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) that contained areas of controversy or uncertainty: recurrent early miscarriage (REM), fetal death, delivery <34 weeks for severe preeclampsia or placental insufficiency, postpartum care, and long-term implications and care. The Task Force concluded that the frequency with which women with REM have a high titer of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) or lupus anticoagulant (LA) is somewhat controversial, especially with regard to the diagnostic titers required by the current international criteria for APS. Also, treatment trials involving heparin differ from one another with regard to the patients included and the outcomes achieved. Similarly, the frequency with which women with fetal death or delivery <34 weeks for severe preeclampsia or placental insufficiency have a high titer of aPL or LA is poorly defined, and there is no level I evidence to guide treatment in either group. Suggestions for future studies with regard to both REM and fetal death or delivery <34 weeks for severe preeclampsia or placental insufficiency were discussed and are outlined below. Postpartum and long-term care in women with APS diagnosed solely for obstetric criteria has been largely guided by expert opinion, and systematic evaluations of these populations would be welcome.

PMID:
21303832
DOI:
10.1177/0961203310395054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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