Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obes Surg. 2011 Sep;21(9):1382-8. doi: 10.1007/s11695-011-0360-y.

Nutritional intake and prevalence of nutritional deficiencies prior to surgery in a Spanish morbidly obese population.

Author information

1
Functional Unit of Obesity, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital Clinic Universitari, Barcelona, Spain. vmoize@clinic.ub.es

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of obesity in Spain is on the rise with the consequent increase in bariatric surgery. Studies in non-Mediterranean populations have shown that micronutrient deficits are present before surgery. However, there is no data on this topic in a Spanish population.

METHODS:

We evaluated food intake and the prevalence of nutritional deficiencies in 231 obese patient (72.3% women, 45.6 ± 9.9 years, BMI 48.2 ± 7.8 kg/m(2)) candidates for bariatric surgery. Forty-six normal weight individuals with similar demographic variables except BMI were included for comparison of deficiencies.

RESULTS:

In obese subjects, the mean estimated energy intake was 2,584 ± 987 kcal/day in males and 2,094 ± 669 kcal/day in females (p < 0.05). After adjusting for kilocalorie intake, carbohydrate intake was of 38.7% [CI 36.2 to 41.1] and 39.9% [CI 37.8 to 40.8] (n.s.), lipid intake was 41.9% [CI 39.6 to 44.2] and 43.0% [CI 41.7 to 44.8] (n.s.) and protein intake was 19.1% [CI 17.7 to 20.5] and 17.3% [CI 16.4 to 18.1] (n.s.) for men and women, respectively. The most prevalent deficiency was vitamin D25(OH): obese 94%, control 24%; (p < 0.0001). Above normal PTH levels were observed in 41.0% and 20.0% of obese and normal weight subjects, respectively (p < 0.0497). Increased prevalence of deficiencies in obese patients included magnesium, vitamin B6 and anaemia (p < 0.05). Other vitamin deficiencies were observed although did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nutritional deficiencies are commonly found in the Spanish obese population undergoing bariatric surgery and are significantly more prevalent than in normal weight individuals.

PMID:
21298509
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-011-0360-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center