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Int Orthop. 2011 Dec;35(12):1759-65. doi: 10.1007/s00264-011-1212-z. Epub 2011 Feb 7.

The influence of cementing technique in hip resurfacing arthroplasty on the initial stability of the femoral component.

Author information

1
Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik, Heidelberg, Germany. Rudi_Georg.Bitsch@urz.uni-heidelberg.de

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In clinical and retrieval analyses, over-penetration of cement, incomplete seating of the prosthesis with a resultant polar cement mass, or both, have been associated with early femoral failures of resurfacing arthroplasties. We used human bone specimens to experimentally compare the initial stability of different cementing techniques.

METHODS:

Twenty-six pairs of fresh frozen femora were prepared for resurfacing using original instruments (DePuy ASR). ASR femoral resurfacing prostheses were implanted using two different cementing techniques: (1) component filling and (2) cement applicator. Real-time measurements of pressure and temperature during implantation, analyses of cement penetration and micro motions under torque application were performed.

RESULTS:

Applicator use reduced significantly the cement penetration depth (9.2 mm vs 5.3 mm with the applicator, p = 0.001), polar mantle (8.1 mm vs 2.6 mm, p = 0.008), cement defects (3.7 mm vs 0.1 mm, p = 0.008) and interface temperatures (40.3°C vs 33.1°C, p < 0.001 ). Initial rotational stability showed statistically significant less extreme values with the cement applicator technique (range 3.4-51.7 m°/Nm, 11.0-29.7 m°/Nm, p = 0.024).

CONCLUSIONS:

The cement applicator technique significantly reduces cement defects, incomplete seating, over-penetration and interface temperatures with a more consistent initial stability of the ASR femoral resurfacing prostheses.

PMID:
21298433
PMCID:
PMC3224607
DOI:
10.1007/s00264-011-1212-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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