Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Bone. 2011 May 1;48(5):1140-5. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2011.01.021. Epub 2011 Feb 2.

Vitamin D inadequacy is associated with low-energy distal radius fractures: a case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. jannike.oyen@kir.uib.no

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Vitamin D inadequacy is associated with hip fractures, but the relationship has not been explored for distal radius fractures.

AIMS:

To compare serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) status in low-energy distal radius fracture patients and a group of matched controls, and examine whether observed differences in s-25(OH)D between patients and controls would remain after adjusting for bone mineral density (BMD), body mass index (BMI), and smoking history.

METHODS:

A total of 575 female and 72 male low-energy distal radius fracture patients (50-90 years) and 534 female and 52 male matched controls were included. The primary measure was levels of vitamin D. Secondary measures were BMD assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, BMI and smoking history.

RESULTS:

Mean s-25(OH)D was 66.5nmol/L in female patients and 78.7nmol/L in controls (p<0.001). The corresponding figures in men were 64.5 and 77.0nmol/L (p=0.017). In adjusted conditional logistic regression analyzes, s-25(OH)D <50nmol/L (OR=2.32, 95% CI: 1.47-3.64, p<0.001), and 50-75 (OR=1.70, 95% CI: 1.17-2.47, p=0.005) were associated with distal radius fractures in women. s-25(OH)D <50nmol/L (OR=6.27, 95% CI: 1.17-33.66, p=0.032) was associated with distal radius fractures in men.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vitamin D inadequacy is associated with low-energy distal radius fractures in both women and men. Differences in vitamin D levels are independent of BMD, BMI or smoking history.

PMID:
21295169
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2011.01.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center