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Curr Opin Pediatr. 2011 Apr;23(2):233-9. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0b013e3283445675.

Bisphenol A and children's health.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used chemical that has been shown to adversely affect health outcomes in experimental animal studies, particularly following fetal or early life exposure. Despite widespread human exposure in the United States and developed countries, there are limited epidemiological studies on the association of BPA with adverse health outcomes. This review briefly summarizes the epidemiological literature with special emphasis on childhood health outcomes.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Several studies report correlations between urinary BPA and serum sex steroid hormone concentrations in adults. Two studies report weak associations between urinary BPA concentrations and delayed onset of breast development in girls. One study found a relationship between prenatal BPA exposure and increased hyperactivity and aggression in 2-year-old female children.

SUMMARY:

Additional large prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm and validate findings from animal studies. Even in the absence of epidemiological studies, concern over adverse effects of BPA is warranted given the unique vulnerability of the developing fetus and child. Healthcare providers are encouraged to practice primary prevention and counsel patients to reduce BPA exposures.

PMID:
21293273
PMCID:
PMC6028937
DOI:
10.1097/MOP.0b013e3283445675
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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