Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Deaf Stud Deaf Educ. 2011 Fall;16(4):524-36. doi: 10.1093/deafed/enq060. Epub 2011 Feb 2.

Effect of postsecondary education on the economic status of persons who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Author information

1
National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA. sxsdor@rit.edu

Abstract

This article examines the effect that postsecondary education has on earnings and the duration of time spent in the Social Security disability programs for young persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. Our hypothesis is that investments in postsecondary training increase the likelihood of employment for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing and thus reduce dependency on disability-related income support programs. A longitudinal data set based upon records from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf and Social Security administrative records is used for this analysis. We find that those who graduate, even those who graduate with vocational degrees, experience significant earnings benefits and reductions in the duration of time spent on federal disability programs when compared with those who do not graduate with a degree. This finding suggests that reductions in the duration of time spent on Social Security programs are not limited to those with the highest level of scholastic aptitude and that investments in post-secondary education can benefit a broad group of deaf and hard-of-hearing persons. In addition, the data show that individuals who attend college, but withdraw before graduation, fair no better economically than individuals who never attended college.

PMID:
21289030
DOI:
10.1093/deafed/enq060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center