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Int J Radiat Biol. 2011 Jul;87(7):653-62. doi: 10.3109/09553002.2010.549537. Epub 2011 Jan 28.

Whole mouse blood microRNA as biomarkers for exposure to γ-rays and (56)Fe ion.

Author information

1
Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Biomarkers of ionising radiation exposure are useful in a variety of scenarios, such as medical diagnostic imaging, occupational exposures, and spaceflight. This study investigates to what extent microRNA (miRNA) expression signatures in mouse peripheral blood can be used as biomarkers for exposures to radiation with low and high linear energy transfers.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Mice were irradiated with doses of 0.5, 1.5, or 5.0 Gy γ-rays (dose rate of 0.0136 Gy/s) or with doses of 0.1 or 0.5 Gy (56)Fe ions (dose rate of 0.00208 Gy/s). Total RNA was isolated from whole blood at 6 h or 24 h after irradiation. Three animals per irradiation condition were used. Differentially expressed miRNA were determined by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

RESULTS:

miRNA expression signatures were radiation type-specific and dose- and time-dependent. The differentially expressed miRNA were expressed in either one condition (71%) or multiple conditions (29%). Classifiers based on the differentially expressed miRNA predicted radiation type or dose with accuracies between 75% and 100%. Gene-ontology analyses show that miRNA induced by irradiation are involved in the control of several biological processes, such as mRNA transcription regulation, nucleic-acid metabolism, and development.

CONCLUSION:

miRNA signatures induced by ionising radiation in mouse blood are radiation type- and radiation dose-specific. These findings underline the complexity of the radiation response and the importance of miRNA in it.

PMID:
21271940
PMCID:
PMC3586327
DOI:
10.3109/09553002.2010.549537
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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