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Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2011 Apr;300(4):R958-68. doi: 10.1152/ajpregu.00642.2010. Epub 2011 Jan 26.

Exercise-rest cycles do not alter local and whole body heat loss responses.

Author information

1
Human and Environmental Physiology Research Unit, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that greater core temperatures during intermittent exercise (Ex) are due to attenuated sweating [upper back sweat rate (SR)] and skin blood flow (SkBF) responses. We evaluated the hypothesis that heat loss is not altered during exercise-rest cycles (ER). Ten male participants randomly performed four 120-min trials: 1) 60-min Ex and 60-min recovery (60ER); 2) 3 × 20-min Ex separated by 20-min recoveries (20ER); 3) 6 × 10-min Ex separated by 10-min recoveries (10ER), or 4) 12 × 5-min Ex separated by 5-min recoveries (5ER). Exercise was performed at a workload of 130 W at 35°C. Whole body heat exchange was determined by direct calorimetry. Core temperature, SR (by ventilated capsule), and SkBF (by laser-doppler) were measured continuously. Evaporative heat loss (EHL) progressively increased with each ER, such that it was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.05) at the end of the last compared with the first Ex for 5ER (299 ± 39 vs. 440 ± 41 W), 10ER (425 ± 51 vs. 519 ± 45 W), and 20ER (515 ± 63 vs. 575 ± 74 W). The slope of the EHL response against esophageal temperature significantly increased from the first to the last Ex within the 10ER (376 ± 56 vs. 445 ± 89 W/°C, P ≤ 0.05) and 20ER (535 ± 85 vs. 588 ± 28 W/°C, P ≤ 0.05) conditions, but not during 5ER (296 ± 96 W/°C vs. 278 ± 95 W/°C, P = 0.237). In contrast, the slope of the SkBF response against esophageal temperature did not significantly change from the first to the last Ex (5ER: 51 ± 23 vs. 54 ± 19%/°C, P = 0.848; 10ER: 53 ± 8 vs. 56 ± 21%/°C, P = 0.786; 20ER: 44 ± 20 vs. 50 ± 27%/°C, P = 0.432). Overall, no differences in body heat content and core temperature were observed. These results suggest that altered local and whole body heat loss responses do not explain the previously observed greater core temperatures during intermittent exercise.

PMID:
21270343
DOI:
10.1152/ajpregu.00642.2010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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