Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Radiother Oncol. 2011 Feb;98(2):207-12. doi: 10.1016/j.radonc.2010.12.001. Epub 2011 Jan 25.

Phosphorus-32 therapy for cystic craniopharyngiomas.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

To examine control rates for predominantly cystic craniopharyngiomas treated with intracavitary phosphorus-32 (P-32).

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

22 patients with predominantly cystic craniopharyngiomas were treated at Indiana University between October 1997 and December 2006. Nineteen patients with follow-up of at least 6 months were evaluated. The median patient age was 11 years, median cyst volume was 9 ml, a median dose of 300 Gy was prescribed to the cyst wall, and median follow-up was 62 months.

RESULTS:

Overall cyst control rate after the initial P-32 treatment was 67%. Complete tumor control after P-32 was 42%. Kaplan-Meier 1-, 3-, and 5-year initial freedom-from-progression rates were 68%, 49%, and 31%, respectively. Following salvage therapy, the Kaplan-Meier 1-, 3-, and 5-year ultimate freedom-from-progression rates were 95%, 95%, and 86%, respectively. All patients were alive at the last follow-up. Visual function was stable or improved in 81% when compared prior to P-32 therapy. Pituitary function remained stable in 74% of patients following P-32 therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intracystic P-32 can be an effective and tolerable treatment for controlling cystic components of craniopharyngiomas as a primary treatment or after prior therapies, but frequently allows for progression of solid tumor components. Disease progression in the form of solid tumor progression, re-accumulation of cystic fluid, or development of new cysts may require further radiotherapy or surgical intervention for optimal long-term disease control.

PMID:
21269713
DOI:
10.1016/j.radonc.2010.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center