Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2011 Jan 18;6(1):e14554. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014554.

Suspected motor problems and low preference for active play in childhood are associated with physical inactivity and low fitness in adolescence.

Author information

1
LIKES - Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland. marko.kantomaa@likes.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This prospective longitudinal study investigates whether suspected motor problems and low preference for active play in childhood are associated with physical inactivity and low cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescence.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

The study sample consisted of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (NFBC 1986) composed of 5,767 children whose parents responded to a postal inquiry concerning their children's motor skills at age 8 years and who themselves reported their physical activity at age 16 years. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured with a cycle ergometer test at age 16 years. Odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the level of physical activity and fitness were obtained from multinomial logistic regression and adjusted for socio-economic position and body mass index. Low preference for active play in childhood was associated with physical inactivity (boys: OR 3.31, 95% CI 2.42-4.53; girls: OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.36-2.36) and low cardiorespiratory fitness (boys: OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.27-2.74; girls: OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.09-2.11) in adolescence. Suspected gross (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.33-3.49) and fine (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.35-2.60) motor problems were associated with physical inactivity among boys. Children with suspected motor problems and low preference for active play tended to have an even higher risk of physical inactivity in adolescence.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

Low preference for active play in childhood was associated with physical inactivity and low cardiorespiratory fitness in adolescence. Furthermore, children with suspected motor problems and low preference for active play tended to have an even higher risk of physical inactivity in adolescence. Identification of children who do not prefer active play and who have motor problems may allow targeted interventions to support their motor learning and participation in active play and thereby promote their physical activity and fitness in later life.

PMID:
21267447
PMCID:
PMC3022627
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0014554
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center