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Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Apr;49(4):1026-32. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2011.01.011. Epub 2011 Jan 23.

Evaluation of the potential protective effects of ad libitum black grape juice against liver oxidative damage in whole-body acute X-irradiated rats.

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1
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Bioquímica Toxicológica, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria RS, Brazil.

Abstract

AIMS:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential protective effects of ad libitum black grape (Vitis labrusca) juice against liver oxidative damage in whole-body acute X-irradiated rats.

MAIN METHODS:

Animals were fed ad libitum and drank voluntarily black grape juice or placebo (isocaloric glucose and fructose solution) for 6 days before and 15 days following a 6 Gy X-irradiation from a 200 kV machine.

KEY FINDINGS:

Irradiated animals receiving placebo showed a significant increase in the concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), a marker of lipid peroxidation, as well as a significant decrease in both Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and reduced glutathione concentration (GSH). Black grape juice supplementation resulted in a reversal of lipid peroxidation, Cu/ZnSOD activity, and GSH concentration, towards values not significantly differing from those in non-irradiated, placebo-supplemented rats. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) and Cu/ZnSOD changes in protein expression were observed for irradiated rats. No change in p53 expression or DNA fragmentation was found.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Ad libitum black grape juice intake is able to restore the liver primary antioxidant system against adverse effects due to whole-body acute X-irradiation in rats after 15 days post-irradiation. The results support using antioxidant supplements as a preventive tool against radiation-induced harm.

PMID:
21266186
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2011.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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