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Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e457-63. doi: 10.3109/17477166.2010.549490. Epub 2011 Jan 25.

Adolescent obesity and maternal and paternal sensitivity and monitoring.

Author information

1
Division of General Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Neal.Davis@imail.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if adolescent obesity is associated with parenting characterized by lower sensitivity and lower monitoring of adolescent activities.

METHODS:

We used data from 744 adolescents in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Height and weight were measured at age 15½ years and obesity defined as body mass index ≥ 95th percentile for age and sex. Maternal and paternal sensitivity were assessed by direct observation of a parent-adolescent interaction task. Maternal and paternal monitoring were assessed by parent report. Lower sensitivity and lower monitoring were each defined as the lowest quartiles. Two separate multivariate logistic regression models were created to evaluate, individually for mothers and fathers, associations of sensitivity and monitoring with adolescent obesity, controlling for adolescent sex and race, family income-to-needs ratio, and parental obesity.

RESULTS:

Fourteen percent of the adolescents were obese. Lower sensitivity was associated with adolescent obesity in the maternal parenting model (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-3.86, n = 709), but not paternal parenting model (AOR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.38-1.63, n = 460). Neither maternal nor paternal monitoring was associated with adolescent obesity (AOR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.63-1.68; AOR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.52-2.22, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

Lower maternal sensitivity, measured by direct observation of parent-adolescent interactions, was associated with adolescent obesity. Efforts to prevent and treat childhood obesity, both at the practitioner level and the community level, may be enhanced by educating parents that their reactions to their children's behaviors may have consequences related to obesity.

PMID:
21265607
DOI:
10.3109/17477166.2010.549490
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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