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Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2011 Jun;7(6):337-45. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2010.226. Epub 2011 Jan 25.

Antibacterial effects of vitamin D.

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1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Room 410D, Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, 615 Charles E. Young Drive South, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. mhewison@mednet.ucla.edu

Erratum in

  • Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2011 Aug;7(8):436.

Abstract

Interaction between vitamin D and the immune system has been recognized for many years, but its relevance to normal human physiology has only become evident in the past 5 years. Studies of innate immune responses to pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis have shown that pathogen-recognition receptor-mediated activation of localized vitamin D metabolism and signaling is a key event associated with infection. Vitamin D, acting in an intracrine fashion, is able to induce expression of antibacterial proteins and enhance the environment in which they function. The net effect of these actions is to support increased bacterial killing in a variety of cell types. The efficacy of such a response is highly dependent on vitamin D status; in other words, the availability of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D for intracrine conversion to active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D by the enzyme 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase. The potential importance of this mechanism as a determinant of human disease is underlined by increasing awareness of vitamin D insufficiency across the globe. This Review will explore the molecular and cellular systems associated with antibacterial responses to vitamin D in different tissues and possible consequences of such a response for the prevention and treatment of human immune disorders.

PMID:
21263449
DOI:
10.1038/nrendo.2010.226
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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