Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Parasitol Int. 2011 Jun;60(2):144-50. doi: 10.1016/j.parint.2011.01.004. Epub 2011 Jan 22.

Identification of novel three allergens from Anisakis simplex by chemiluminescent immunoscreening of an expression cDNA library.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8477, Japan.

Abstract

Anisakis simplex is a representative nematode parasitizing marine organisms, such as fish and squids, and causes not only anisakiasis but also IgE-mediated allergy. Although 10 kinds of proteins have so far been identified as A. simplex allergens, many unknown allergens are considered to still exist. In this study, a chemiluminescent immunoscreening method with higher sensitivity than the conventional method was developed and used to isolate IgE-positive clones from an expression cDNA library of A. simplex. As a result, three kinds of proteins, Ani s 11 (307 amino acid residues), Ani s 11-like protein (160 residues) and Ani s 12 (295 residues), together with three known allergens (Ani s 5, 6 and 9), were found to be IgE reactive. Furthermore, ELISA data showed that both recombinant Ani s 11 and 12 expressed in Escherichia coli are recognized by about half of Anisakis-allergic patients. Ani s 11 and Ani s 11-like protein are characterized by having six and five types of short repetitive sequences (5-16 amino acid residues), respectively. Both proteins share as high as 78% sequence identity with each other and also about 45% identity with Ani s 10, which includes two types of short repetitive sequences. On the other hand, Ani s 12 is also structurally unique in that it has five tandem repeats of a CX(13-25)CX(9)CX(7,8)CX(6) sequence, similar to Ani s 7 having 19 repeats of a CX(17-25)CX(9-22)CX(8)CX(6) sequence. The repetitive structures are assumed to be involved in the IgE-binding of the three new allergens.

PMID:
21262386
DOI:
10.1016/j.parint.2011.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center