Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Cardiol. 2011 Apr 1;107(7):1028-33. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.11.026. Epub 2011 Jan 20.

Angiotensin II receptor blockers and risk of cancer in patients with systemic hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC

Abstract

Recently, concerns have been raised that angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) may be associated with an increased risk for cancer development. However, the relation between ARBs and cancer is still unclear. Therefore, a nationwide population-based study was conducted to investigate the possible influence of ARBs on the occurrence of new cancers in patients with hypertension by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. A total of 109,002 patients with newly diagnosed hypertension were identified from a cohort database of 1 million individuals from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2006. Among them, 40,124 (36.8%) had received ARBs for hypertension. The end point was the development of any type of cancer before the end of 2007. During an average of 5.7 ± 2.6 years of follow-up, a total of 9,067 cases of new cancer occurrence were observed. The log-rank test showed that the occurrence rate of newly diagnosed cancers in the subjects receiving ARBs was significantly lower than those receiving treatment without ARBs (ARBs vs controls 3,082 vs 5,985, p <0.001). After adjusting for age, gender, co-morbidities, and medications for hypertension control, ARB use was found to be independently associated with a decreased risk for cancer occurrence (hazard ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 0.68, p <0.001). In conclusion, long-term use of ARBs is associated with a lower incidence of cancer occurrence, thereby suggesting that ARBs may prevent cancer development.

PMID:
21256465
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.11.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center