Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Injury. 2012 Apr;43(4):397-401. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2010.12.014. Epub 2011 Jan 19.

Incidental durotomy during spine surgery: incidence, management and complications. A retrospective review.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University Hospital of Bordeaux, Spinal Unit, Place Amélie Raba Léon, Bordeaux, France. pguerin_patrick@yahoo.fr

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective review of a series of patients who underwent spinal surgery at a single spine unit during a 1 year period.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the incidence, treatment, clinical consequence, complications of incidental durotomy during spine surgery and results of 37 months clinical follow-up.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Incidental durotomy is an underestimated and relatively adverse event during spinal surgery. Several consequences of inadequately treated dural tears have been reported.

METHODS:

A retrospective review was conducted on 1326 consecutive patients who underwent spinal surgery performed in one French spine unit from January 2005 to December 2005. We excluded from this study patients treated for emergency spine cases.

RESULTS:

Fifty-one dural tears were identified (3.84%). Incidental durotomies were associated with anterior cervical approach in 1 case, with posterior cervical approach in 1 case, with anterior retroperitoneal approach in 1 case and with posterior thoracolumbar approach in 48 cases. In addition, any clinically significant durotomy unrecognised during surgical procedure were included. Thirteen patients presented postoperative complications including 7 cerebrospinal fluid leaks, 2 wound infections, 2 postoperative haematomas, and 2 pseudomeningoceles. Nine of these 13 patients required a revision procedure. A mean follow-up of 37 months showed good long-term clinical results.

CONCLUSIONS:

Incidental durotomy is a common complication of spine surgery. All incidental durotomies must be repaired primarily. Dural tears that were immediately recognised and treated accordingly did not lead to any significant sequelae at a mean follow-up of 37 months. However, long-term follow-up studies will be needed to confirm this finding. The risks associated with dural tears and cerebrospinal fluid leaks are serious and should be discussed with any patients undergoing spine surgery.

PMID:
21251652
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2010.12.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center