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Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2010 Dec;119(12):789-94.

Computed tomography and otosclerosis: a practical method to correlate the sites affected to hearing loss.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20007, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We present a practical method for correlating computed tomography (CT) scans with hearing loss in otosclerosis.

METHODS:

We reviewed the CT scans of 18 patients (34 ears) with clinical otosclerosis who were seen between 2007 and 2008. The scans were reviewed by an otologist in a clinical office setting, followed by a blinded radiologist working at an imaging workstation. The 5 most commonly affected sites in otosclerosis were evaluated for evidence of otospongiosis and then correlated with the degree of air-bone gap and sensorineural hearing loss.

RESULTS:

Positive CT findings were noted in 70.5% of ears, with a 94% concordance between readings. The sites affected included the ante fenestram (21 ears), round window niche (12), cochlear promontory (4), cochlear apex (3), and posterior fenestram (2). The average air-bone gap increased with each additional site of involvement within an otic capsule (p = 0.004). The bone conduction threshold also increased, on average, with each additional affected site (p = 0.047).

CONCLUSIONS:

Most patients with clinical evidence of otosclerosis have evidence of otosclerosis on CT that is readily detected in the office setting. Ears with more affected sites have a significantly greater degree of air-bone gap and sensorineural hearing loss.

PMID:
21250549
DOI:
10.1177/000348941011901201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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