Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jan 19;(1):CD007821. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007821.pub2.

Heated CO(2) with or without humidification for minimally invasive abdominal surgery.

Author information

1
Center for the Advancement of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T5H 3V9.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intraoperative hypothermia during both open and laparoscopic abdominal surgery may be associated with adverse events. For laparoscopic abdominal surgery, the use of heated insufflation systems for establishing pneumoperitoneum has been described to prevent hypothermia. Humidification of the insufflated gas is also possible. Past studies have shown inconclusive results with regards to maintenance of core temperature and reduction of postoperative pain and recovery times.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the effect of heated gas insufflation on patient outcomes following minimally invasive abdominal surgery.

SEARCH STRATEGY:

The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), Web of Science, Scopus, www.clinicaltrials.gov and the National Research Register were searched (1956 to 14 June 2010). Grey literature and cross-references were also searched. Searches were limited to human studies without language restriction.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

All included studies were randomized trials comparing heated (with or without humidification) gas insufflation with cold gas insufflation in adult and pediatric populations undergoing minimally invasive abdominal procedures. Study quality was assessed in regards to relevance, design, sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, possibility of incomplete data and selective reporting. The selection of studies for the review was done independently by two authors, with any disagreement resolved in consensus with a third co-author.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Screening of eligible studies, data extraction and methodological quality assessment of the trials were performed by the authors. Data from eligible studies were collected using data sheets. Results were presented using mean differences for continuous outcomes and relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for dichotomous outcomes. The estimated effects were calculated using the latest version of RevMan software. Publication bias was taken into consideration and funnel plots were compiled.

MAIN RESULTS:

Sixteen studies were included in the analysis. During laparoscopic abdominal surgery, no effect on postoperative pain nor changes in core temperature, morphine consumption, length of hospitalisation, lens fogging, length of operation or recovery room stay were associated with heated compared to cold gas insufflation with or without humidification.

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS:

The study offers evidence that during laparoscopic abdominal surgery, heated gas insufflation, with or without humidification, has minimal benefit on patient outcomes.

PMID:
21249696
DOI:
10.1002/14651858.CD007821.pub2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center