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PLoS One. 2011 Jan 10;6(1):e16130. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016130.

Rates of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Kampala-Uganda are low and not associated with HIV infection.

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1
Public Health Department, Kampala City Council, Kampala, Uganda.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Drug resistance among tuberculosis patients in sub-Saharan Africa is increasing, possibly due to association with HIV infection. We studied drug resistance and HIV infection in a representative sample of 533 smear-positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed in Kampala, Uganda.

METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Among 473 new patients, multidrug resistance was found in 5 (1.1%, 95% CI 0.3-2.5) and resistance to any drug in 57 (12.1%, 9.3-15.3). Among 60 previously treated patients this was 7 (11.7%, 4.8-22.6) and 17 (28.3%; 17.5-41.4), respectively. Of 517 patients with HIV results, 165 (31.9%, 27.9-36.1) tested positive. Neither multidrug (adjusted odds ratio (OR(adj)) 0.7; 95% CI 0.19-2.6) nor any resistance (OR(adj) 0.7; 0.43-1.3) was associated with HIV status. Primary resistance to any drug was more common among patients who had worked in health care (OR(adj) 3.5; 1.0-12.0).

CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE:

Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance rates in Kampala are low and not associated with HIV infection, but may be associated with exposure during health care.

PMID:
21249225
PMCID:
PMC3018425
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0016130
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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