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Arch Oral Biol. 2011 Jun;56(6):588-91. doi: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2010.12.002. Epub 2011 Jan 17.

Presence of wax esters and squalene in human saliva.

Author information

1
Dows Institute for Dental Research, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and relative composition of neutral lipids in human saliva.

DESIGN:

Whole unstimulated saliva was collected from 12 subjects ranging from 21 to 29 years old. Samples were lyophilized, and lipids were extracted using chloroform-methanol. Lipids were analysed by thin-layer chromatography.

RESULTS:

Human saliva contains cholesterol, fatty acids, triglycerides, wax esters, cholesterol esters and squalene. The mean total neutral lipid content was 12.1±6.3 μg/ml.

CONCLUSIONS:

These lipids in human saliva closely resemble the lipids found on the skin surface. These salivary lipids are most likely produced by the sebaceous follicles in the oral mucosa and sebaceous glands associated with major salivary glands.

PMID:
21247555
PMCID:
PMC3095707
DOI:
10.1016/j.archoralbio.2010.12.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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