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J Paediatr Child Health. 2011 May;47(5):266-70. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1754.2010.01953.x. Epub 2011 Jan 18.

Decline in rotavirus hospitalisations following introduction of Australia's national rotavirus immunisation programme.

Author information

1
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia. kristinm@chw.edu.au

Abstract

AIM:

To determine the impact of rotavirus immunisation on rotavirus hospitalisations in young children. methods: Annual hospitalisations for rotavirus gastroenteritis to The Children's Hospital at Westmead, a tertiary care paediatric hospital in Sydney, were recorded from 2001 for 6 years prior to and 2.5 years following the introduction of rotavirus vaccines to the National Immunisation Program. Data on hospital-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis were collected prospectively.

RESULTS:

Hospitalisations for rotavirus gastroenteritis declined in the two full rotavirus seasons (2008 and 2009) after vaccine introduction by 75% compared with mean annual hospitalisations from 2001 to 2006. The greatest decline was seen in those <12 months of age (93%), but the reduction occurred consistently across all age groups, even in children not eligible for immunisation, suggesting an effect on herd immunity. A substantial decline in nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis was seen from 2007 to 2009, suggesting a reduction in virus transmission in the hospital setting.

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrates a substantial reduction in hospitalisations in children of all ages to a large paediatric hospital and reduced nosocomial infections since the introduction of a nationally funded rotavirus immunisation programme in Australia.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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