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Guidelines on ambient intramural airborne fungal spores.

Author information

1
Aerobiology Unit, Institute for Lung Health, Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To generate baseline data for indoor airborne fungal spores in noncomplaint residential properties (with no moisture/mold-related problems) and to identify home characteristics indicative of elevated fungal levels.

METHODS:

Air samples were collected onto petroleum jelly-coated slides from living rooms of 100 residential properties in Leicestershire, United Kingdom, using a Burkard continuous recording air sampler. The slides were examined by microscopy to determine fungal spore concentrations (spores/m3 air/day).

RESULTS:

Total indoor fungal spore concentrations were approximately 16% of outdoor concentrations. Abundant indoor fungal genera include Cladosporium, Sporobolomyces, Tilletiopsis, and Didymella, all of which followed seasonal patterns of release and detection. No clear association was shown between outdoor-predominant fungi and home characteristics. In contrast, Aspergillus/Penicillium-type (Asp/ Pen-type) spores were common indoors and exceeded outdoor levels, with the highest concentrations detected in properties over 90 years old (P = .006) and terraced properties (P = .003).

CONCLUSION:

Asp/Pen-type spores are found in noncomplaint UK residential properties and mostly in old terraced houses. This study provides guidelines on acceptable levels of Asp/Pen-type spores and other abundant indoor fungal taxa that can be comparatively used in clinical evaluations of fungal exposure-related disease.

PMID:
21243933
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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