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Acta Paediatr. 2011 Mar;100(3):370-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2010.02064.x. Epub 2011 Jan 17.

Predictors of the risk of cognitive deficiency in very preterm infants: the EPIPAGE prospective cohort.

Author information

1
INSERM, UMR S953, Epidemiological Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's and Children's Health, Hôpital Tenon, F-75020, Paris, France. ghbeaino@chusa.jussieu.fr

Abstract

AIM:

To assess cerebral lesions and other medical as well as social characteristics as predictors of risk of mild and severe cognitive deficiencies in very preterm infants.

METHODS:

As part of the EPIPAGE population-based prospective cohort study, perinatal data and cognitive outcome at 5 years of age were recorded for 1503 infants born before 33 weeks of gestation in nine regions of France in 1997. Mild cognitive deficiency was defined as a Mental Processing Composite score on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children test of between 70 and 84, and severe cognitive deficiency as a score of <70.

RESULTS:

After controlling for cerebral lesions and other medical as well as social factors, low parental socio-economic status and lack of breastfeeding were significant predictors of mild and severe cognitive deficiencies, whereas presence of cerebral lesions, being small for gestational age and having a large number of siblings were predictors of severe cognitive deficiency.

CONCLUSION:

Predictors of poor cognitive outcome in very preterm infants are low social status, lack of breastfeeding, presence of cerebral lesions on ultrasound scan, being born small for gestational age and having a high number of siblings. Social factors predicted both mild and severe cognitive deficiencies, whereas medical factors predicted mostly severe cognitive deficiencies.

Comment in

PMID:
21241364
PMCID:
PMC3080666
DOI:
10.1111/j.1651-2227.2010.02064.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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