Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Support Care Cancer. 2011 Jun;19(6):853-7. doi: 10.1007/s00520-011-1089-9. Epub 2011 Jan 16.

Body mass index and breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, 460 21st Avenue South, 525 Godchaux Hall, Nashville, TN 37240, USA. sheila.ridner@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The main purpose was to examine longitudinally the influence of body mass index (BMI) and obesity on the development of breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema. We asked, does elevated BMI increase lymphedema risk?

METHODS:

A secondary analysis was conducted on de-identified data collected from 138 newly diagnosed breast cancer survivors who had arm-volume measurements and symptom assessment at pre-treatment baseline and measurements up to 30 months post-surgery in a prospective longitudinal parent study. Arm volume and weight data, part of the information collected during each participant visit, were examined.

RESULTS:

Breast cancer survivors whose BMI was ≥30 at the time of breast cancer treatment were approximately 3.6 times more likely to develop lymphedema at 6 months or greater after diagnosis than those with a BMI < 30 at the time of cancer treatment (95% confidence interval, C.I., for odds ratio, O.R., 1.42-9.04; p = 0.007). Those with a general BMI increase or a BMI rise to 30 or greater during their first 30 months of survivorship were not more likely to develop late-onset lymphedema than those who did not have similar changes in BMI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pre-treatment BMI may be a risk factor for lymphedema. Weight gain post-treatment may not be. Further research is warranted.

PMID:
21240649
PMCID:
PMC4480912
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-011-1089-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center