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J Pediatr Surg. 2011 Jan;46(1):150-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2010.09.083.

Elements of successful intestinal rehabilitation.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric General Surgery, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. sigalet@ucalgary.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The optimal therapy for intestinal failure (IF) is unknown. The results of a systematic, protocol-driven management strategy by a multidisciplinary team are described.

METHODS:

Intestinal failure was defined as bowel length of less than 40 cm or parenteral nutrition (PN) for more than 42 days. A multidisciplinary team and protocol to prevent PN-associated liver disease (PNALD) were instituted in 2006. Data were gathered prospectively with consent and ethics board approval.

RESULTS:

From 1998 to 2006, 33 patients were treated (historical cohort) with an overall survival of 72%. Rotating prophylactic antibiotics for bacterial overgrowth were given to 27% of patients; 6% had lipid-sparing PN, and none received fish oil-based lipids. Median time to intestinal rehabilitation was 7 ± 3.1 months, and 27% of patients who developed PNALD died. From 2006 to 2009, 31 patients were treated. Seventy-seven percent received PAB; 60%, lipid-sparing PN; and 47%, parenteral fish oil emulsion. Eighty-seven percent weaned from PN at 3.9 ± 3.8 months, and no patients developed PNALD with 100% survival. Novel lipid therapies were associated with changes in essential fatty acid profile and one case of clinical essential fatty acid deficiency.

CONCLUSION:

The institution of a multidisciplinary team and a protocol-driven strategy to prevent PNALD improves survival in IF. Further studies are recommended.

PMID:
21238657
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2010.09.083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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