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Dig Dis Sci. 2011 Mar;56(3):830-6. doi: 10.1007/s10620-010-1544-3. Epub 2011 Jan 11.

Vitamin D deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease.

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1
School of Women's & Children's Health, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Osteopenia and osteoporosis are commonly seen in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D deficiency potentially contributes to diminished bone acquisition in childhood.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of this study were to assess vitamin D in a group of Australian children with IBD and to ascertain associations between vitamin D status and key clinical factors, for example disease location and severity.

METHODS:

Data were obtained retrospectively from the records of children with IBD who had at least one measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) over a two-year period. Demographic variables, disease activity, inflammatory markers, disease location, duration, and therapy were recorded. Moderate and severe deficiency were defined as 25(OH)D <51 nmol/l and <30 nmol/l, respectively. Insufficiency was defined as 25(OH)D between 51 and 75 nmol/l.

RESULTS:

Overall, the mean 25(OH)D level in 78 children (104 measurements) was 71.2 (SD ± 26.5) nmol/l. Fifteen (19%) children were vitamin D deficient and 30 (38%) children were insufficient. Levels of 25(OH)D were not associated with disease location or use of immunosuppressive drugs. Children with vitamin D deficiency had greater corticosteroid exposure than those with normal status (P = 0.001). The mean 25(OH)D of 38 children treated with nutritional therapy at diagnosis was higher than for 17 children initially treated with corticosteroids (P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

A high proportion of these Australian children with IBD were vitamin D deficient. This emphasizes the importance of monitoring vitamin D status, and treating deficiency, in the management of pediatric IBD. The possible benefit of nutritional therapy in protection against vitamin D deficiency requires further prospective study.

PMID:
21222159
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-010-1544-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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