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World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jan 7;17(1):9-14. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i1.9.

Autofluorescence imaging and magnification endoscopy.

Author information

1
Research Center of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Craiova, Dolj, 200349, Romania. monalisafilip@yahoo.com

Abstract

It is well known that angiogenesis is critical in the transition from premalignant to malignant lesions. Consequently, early detection and diagnosis based on morphological changes to the microvessels are crucial. In the last few years, new imaging techniques which utilize the properties of light-tissue interaction have been developed to increase early diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) tract neoplasia. We analyzed several "red-flag" endoscopic techniques used to enhance visualization of the vascular pattern of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions (e.g. trimodal imaging including autofluorescence imaging, magnifying endoscopy and narrow band imaging). These new endoscopic techniques provide better visualization of mucosal microsurface structure and microvascular architecture and may enhance the diagnosis and characterization of mucosal lesions in the GI tract. In the near future, it is expected that trimodal imaging endoscopy will be practiced as a standard endoscopy technique as it is quick, safe and accurate for making a precise diagnosis of gastrointestinal pathology, with an emphasis on the diagnosis of early GI tract cancers. Further large-scale randomized controlled trials comparing these modalities in different patient subpopulations are warranted before their endorsement in the routine practice of GI endoscopy.

KEYWORDS:

Angiogenesis; Autofluorescence imaging; Multiband imaging; Narrow band imaging; Zoom endoscopy

PMID:
21218078
PMCID:
PMC3016686
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v17.i1.9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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