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Addict Behav. 2011 Apr;36(4):354-61. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2010.12.013. Epub 2010 Dec 10.

Protective behavioral strategies mediate the effect of drinking motives on alcohol use among heavy drinking college students: gender and race differences.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA 90045, USA. jlabrie@lmu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined the extent to which protective behavioral strategies (PBS) mediated the influence of drinking motives on alcohol consumption, and if these hypothesized relationships were corroborated across subsamples of gender and race.

METHOD:

Online surveys were completed by 1592 heavy drinking college undergraduates from two universities (49.9% male and 50.1% female; 76.9% Caucasian and 23.1% Asian). Independent samples t-tests compared males and females as well as Caucasians and Asians on measures of drinking motives, PBS use, and alcohol consumption, and structural equation models examined the mediating role of PBS.

RESULTS:

Consistent with predictions, t-tests revealed that males reported greater levels of consumption than females, but females reported greater use of PBS than males. Caucasians reported greater consumption levels, endorsed higher enhancement motives, and higher PBS related to serious harm reduction, but Asians endorsed higher coping and conformity motives, and PBS focused on stopping/limiting drinking. In multiple-sample SEM analyses, PBS were shown to largely mediate the relationship between motives and consumption in all demographic subsamples.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings indicate that PBS use leads to reductions in drinking despite pre-established drinking motives, hence pointing to the potential value of standalone PBS skills training interventions in lowering alcohol use among diverse groups of heavy drinking college students.

PMID:
21215529
PMCID:
PMC4039406
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2010.12.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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