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Int J Cancer. 2011 Nov 15;129(10):2492-501. doi: 10.1002/ijc.25905. Epub 2011 Apr 8.

The association of body mass index with mortality in the California Teachers Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-7550, USA.

Abstract

Although underweight and obesity have been associated with increased risk of mortality, it remains unclear whether the associations differ by hormone therapy (HT) use and smoking. The authors examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and mortality within the California Teachers Study (CTS), specifically considering the impact of HT and smoking. The authors examined the associations of underweight and obesity with risks of all-cause and cause-specific mortality, among 115,433 women participating in the CTS, and specifically examined whether HT use or smoking modifies the effects of obesity. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression provided estimates of relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During follow up, 10,574 deaths occurred. All-cause mortality was increased for underweight (BMI <18.5; adjusted RR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.20-1.47) and obese participants (BMI ≥ 30: RR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.19-1.37) relative to BMI of 18.5-24.9). Respiratory disease mortality was increased for underweight and obese participants. Death from any cancer, and breast cancer specifically, and cardiovascular disease was observed only for obese participants. The obesity and mortality association remained after stratification on HT and smoking. Obese participants remained at greater risk for mortality after stratification on menopausal HT and smoking. Obesity was associated with increased all-cause mortality, as well as death from any cancer (including breast), and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. These findings help to identify groups at risk for BMI-related poor health outcomes.

PMID:
21207419
PMCID:
PMC3246901
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.25905
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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