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Science. 2010 Dec 24;330(6012):1768-73. doi: 10.1126/science.1195568.

Has the microbiota played a critical role in the evolution of the adaptive immune system?

Author information

1
Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.

Abstract

Although microbes have been classically viewed as pathogens, it is now well established that the majority of host-bacterial interactions are symbiotic. During development and into adulthood, gut bacteria shape the tissues, cells, and molecular profile of our gastrointestinal immune system. This partnership, forged over many millennia of coevolution, is based on a molecular exchange involving bacterial signals that are recognized by host receptors to mediate beneficial outcomes for both microbes and humans. We explore how specific aspects of the adaptive immune system are influenced by intestinal commensal bacteria. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that mediate symbiosis between commensal bacteria and humans may redefine how we view the evolution of adaptive immunity and consequently how we approach the treatment of numerous immunologic disorders.

PMID:
21205662
PMCID:
PMC3159383
DOI:
10.1126/science.1195568
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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