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Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Jun;469(6):1735-42. doi: 10.1007/s11999-010-1746-1. Epub 2011 Jan 4.

Pelvic deformity influences acetabular version and coverage in hip dysplasia.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although a wide variety of acetabular deformities in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) have been reported, the morphologic features of the entire pelvis in DDH are not well characterized and their correlation with acetabular deformity is unknown.

QUESTIONS/PURPOSES:

We determined whether there was a rotational deformity of the entire innominate bone, and if so, whether it related to acetabular version and coverage.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We examined the morphologic features of the pelvis using CT for 50 patients with DDH (82 hips). Forty normal hips were used as controls. The innominate rotation angle was determined at three levels in the axial plane. The acetabular sector angle served as an indicator of acetabular coverage of the femoral head. We evaluated the association between innominate rotation angles and acetabular version and coverage.

RESULTS:

We observed greater internal rotation of the innominate bone in patients with DDH than in the control subjects. Internal rotation of the innominate bone was associated with increased acetabular anteversion angle and acetabular inclination angle. In hips with acetabular retroversion (nine of 82 hips; 11.0 %), the entire innominate bone was externally rotated, compared with hips with acetabular anteversion. Internal rotation of the innominate bone also was associated with decreased anterior and superior acetabular coverage.

CONCLUSION:

Our observations suggest structural abnormalities exist throughout the pelvis in DDH, and the morphologic abnormalities of the acetabulum are not caused solely by local dysplasia around the hip, but are influenced by the morphologic features of the entire pelvis.

PMID:
21203874
PMCID:
PMC3094603
DOI:
10.1007/s11999-010-1746-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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