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Pediatr Pulmonol. 2011 May;46(5):442-51. doi: 10.1002/ppul.21387. Epub 2010 Dec 30.

Race and asthma control in the pediatric population of Hawaii.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, California. wupedspulm@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The racially unique population of Hawaii has one of the highest prevalences of childhood asthma in America. We estimate the prevalence of impaired asthma control among asthmatic children in Hawaii and determine which factors are associated with impaired control.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We analyzed data from 477 asthmatic children living in Hawaii participating in the 2006-2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Asthma Call-Back Surveys. Impaired asthma control was modeled after 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with impaired asthma control.

RESULTS:

Children (53.8%) with asthma were either part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. While 35.6% of asthmatic children met criteria for impaired asthma control, being part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander was not associated with impaired control. Only 31.1% of children with impaired control reported the use of inhaled corticosteroids despite >80% having had a routine checkup for asthma in the past year and receipt of asthma education from a healthcare provider.

CONCLUSION:

A large proportion of asthmatic children in Hawaii have impaired asthma control that does not appear to be associated with race but may be associated with inadequate pharmacologic therapy. While a significant percentage reported receiving routine asthma care and asthma education, a minority reported using inhaled corticosteroids. Reasons for this discrepancy between asthma assessment and treatment are unclear. However, additional education on part of the physician, community, and healthcare system are likely to improve management and reduce morbidity in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma Call-Back Survey, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System; Hawaii; asthma; asthma control; impaired asthma; pediatric

PMID:
21194172
DOI:
10.1002/ppul.21387
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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