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Cyberpsychol Behav Soc Netw. 2011 Apr;14(4):183-9. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2010.0061. Epub 2010 Dec 30.

The relationship between Facebook and the well-being of undergraduate college students.

Author information

1
Psychology Department, Assumption College, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609, USA. mkalpido@assumption.edu

Abstract

We investigated how Facebook use and attitudes relate to self-esteem and college adjustment, and expected to find a positive relationship between Facebook and social adjustment, and a negative relationship between Facebook, self-esteem, and emotional adjustment. We examined these relationships in first-year and upper-class students and expected to find differences between the groups. Seventy undergraduate students completed Facebook measures (time, number of friends, emotional and social connection to Facebook), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Student Adaptation to College Scale. First-year students had a stronger emotional connection to and spent more time on Facebook while they reported fewer friends than upper-class students did. The groups did not differ in the adjustment scores. The number of Facebook friends potentially hinders academic adjustment, and spending a lot of time on Facebook is related to low self-esteem. The number of Facebook friends was negatively associated with emotional and academic adjustment among first-year students but positively related to social adjustment and attachment to institution among upper-class students. The results suggest that the relationship becomes positive later in college life when students use Facebook effectively to connect socially with their peers. Lastly, the number of Facebook friends and not the time spent on Facebook predicted college adjustment, suggesting the value of studying further the notion of Facebook friends.

PMID:
21192765
DOI:
10.1089/cyber.2010.0061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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