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Ann Diagn Pathol. 2011 Apr;15(2):93-7. doi: 10.1016/j.anndiagpath.2010.07.012. Epub 2010 Dec 28.

Cutaneous angiosarcoma. Analysis of 434 cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 1973-2007.

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1
Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, and Médica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico. alboresjorge@yahoo.com

Abstract

Cutaneous angiosarcoma is an aggressive malignant mesenchymal vasoformative neoplasm that accounts for 1% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Using data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, we analyzed the demographics and survival of cutaneous angiosarcoma. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program recorded 434 cases of cutaneous angiosarcoma from 1973 to 2007. The incidence was nearly the same in men (222 cases) and women (212 cases). Most patients were white (88%) with a mean age of 73 years. African Americans made up only 4% of the cases. Two hundred seventy (62%) cases were tumors of the head and neck, whereas 106 (24%) cases arose in the skin of the trunk. Grade was recorded in 194 cases (45%): 28 were grade I, 44 were grade II, 60 were grade III, and 62 were grade IV. Survival rates of cutaneous angiosarcoma correlated with age, anatomical site, and stage of disease. Patients younger than 50 years had a 10-year relative survival rate of 71.7%, whereas patients 50 years and older had a 36.8% 10-year survival rate. Tumors of the scalp and neck resulted in a 13.8% 10-year relative survival rate, whereas tumors arising in the trunk resulted in a 75.3% 10-year survival rate. Tumors localized to the skin had better prognosis (53.6% 10-year relative survival rate) than those with regional or distant stage (19.0% and 6.2%). Twenty-six percent of patients with angiosarcoma had a prior primary. Cutaneous angiosarcomas arise predominantly in the head and neck of white individuals older than 60 years.

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