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Oncol Nurs Forum. 2011 Jan;38(1):E55-9. doi: 10.1188/11.ONF.E55-E59.

Tailoring cancer education and support programs for low-income, primarily African American cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham. mymartin@uab.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

to identify the information and stress-management topics of most interest to low-income, predominantly African American cancer survivors.

RESEARCH APPROACH:

descriptive, cross sectional.

SETTING:

outpatient oncology clinic in a public hospital in Birmingham, Alabama.

PARTICIPANTS:

25 patients with cancer; 12 were men, 22 were African Americans, and 16 had a 12th-grade education or less.

METHODOLOGIC APPROACH:

patients ranked potential topics to be included in an educational curriculum.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

quantitative rankings of information and stress-management priorities.

FINDINGS:

learning about cancer, understanding cancer treatments, relieving cancer pain, and keeping well in mind and body were the most highly ranked topics among those offered within the American Cancer Society's I Can Cope curriculum, which also included supportive topics such as mobilizing social support. The preferred stress-management topics were humor therapy, music therapy, meditation, and relaxation; lower-ranked topics included pet therapy and art as therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

cancer survivors appear most interested in topics specific to their illness and treatment versus supportive topics. Stress management also received high rankings.

INTERPRETATION:

nurses have a key role in providing patient education and support. Tailoring education programs may better target specific needs and improve the quality of cancer care of underserved patients.

PMID:
21186152
DOI:
10.1188/11.ONF.E55-E59
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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